The Power of Music A drum beat, a guitar strum, a melody, a song. A toe tap, a finger snap, and soon you’re humming along. Music can move us emotionally and physically without us having to even think about it. Its power to reach past the mind and touch the soul has a soothing therapeutic effect particularly beneficial to someone with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias

 

The Power of Music

A drum beat, a guitar strum, a melody, a song. A toe tap, a finger snap, and soon you’re humming along. Music can move us emotionally and physically without us having to even think about it. Its power to reach past the mind and touch the soul has a soothing therapeutic effect particularly beneficial to someone with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias.

A study published in the Journal of Music Therapydemonstrated that playing familiar background music helped to increase positive social behaviours in people with Alzheimer’s and decrease negative behaviours related to agitation.

Music has also been proven to drastically decrease anxiety and depression in people with Alzheimer’s disease, according to a study published in the Journal of Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders. One caregiver summed up her experience with music saying that she would wake her husband up every morning to the Louis Armstrong song, “Wonderful World,” and “He always started the day in a great mood.”

Even when the usual means of communication become inhibited by the effects of Alzheimer’s or other dementias, those experiencing memory loss still remember and respond to music.

You can leverage the power of music in a number of different ways to lift the spirits of a family member with dementia and unlock memories from long ago.

One way is to create a “life soundtrack” that includes memorable songs from your loved one’s childhood, teenage, young adult and older years. Research the top hits from each decade of your loved one’s life, find out what songs were played at his or her wedding, and pick out some well-loved hymns or carols. If your family member with dementia used to play a musical instrument, include music featuring that instrument as well.

You can also encourage your family member with dementia to not just listen but take part in the music making. Singing daily can have a positive effect on one’s mental state. Many senior centres and other community organizations provide opportunities to sing with a group, play an instrument (even if just a woodblock or tambourine), or simply clap along. And when you play the soundtrack you created for you loved one, sing along together. You may be surprised how many lyrics your loved one still remembers by heart.

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Other senses have the ability to arouse feeling and memories in a person with dementia, but smell is the most direct. According to psychologist Maria Larsson, “The two cerebral structures, the amygdala and the hippocampus play an important role for the storing of memories, and the olfactory nerve has very direct connections to both structures.”1

Help your family member with dementia feel the strong emotions and warm memories associated with smells by baking, go for a walk just after it rains, fold the laundry together, or come up with activity ideas of your own that will generate aromas particularly significant to your loved one. Saw dust, a campfire, garlic bread, a fine red wine, perfume, pine, and soap are just a few ideas of scents that may unlock rich, emotional memories and bring comfort to someone with dementia.